15 February 2016 — Presidents Day in the US, RI’s Next President

NOTE

By Club consensus during a 10 January 2016 planning session, the “poll” at the bottom of the Program page has been removed. Members are asked to post a comment each week. If you don’t have something interesting to say–although with our members we know what you have to say is interesting–feel free to say “Present” or “Here” or “Beam me up, Scotty!” or write your favorite color, just let us know you were here.

IMPORTANT DATES

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 21 — 10:00pm to 4:00pm  — The next ONE MORE ITEM FOOD DRIVE, in support of Valley Food Bank, at Gelson’s in Sherman Oaks. Shift schedule visible by accessing the CALENDAR from the links menu.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28 — 12:30pm to 2:00pmOur FOURTH SUNDAY meeting for February! Speaker: Kevin Taylor, West San Fernando Valley Area Representative for Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.  We gather in The Fireplace Room at Denny’s, 5525 Sepulveda Boulevard in Sherman Oaks.  (Meeting reminders: Inspiration, Mel; Pledge, TBA; Four-Way Test, TBA; Rotary Minute, TBA; Mini Craft Talk: Linda C.)  BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING in The Fireplace Room at 11:00 a.m.

CLUB ANNOUNCEMENT

We have launched our Clunkers4Charity fundraiser! If you know of anyone (yourself included) who wants or needs to donate a car for tax purposes, send them to our website…and to the Clunkers4Charity “Link” you see at the right side of this page. Funds we raise will go right into the community for our projects.

 

THIS WEEK’S PROGRAM

 

JohnGerm

 

 

 

 

 

This week’s Program begins on the Presidents Day holiday in the United States. This creates the opportunity to introduce our Club Members and visitors to the next President of Rotary International, John Germ, who begins a one-year term on July 1, 2016. The President of RI is selected by a nominating committee.

From RI’s announcement in August of 2014, when Mr. Germ became President-Nominee (and now carries the title President-Elect):

John F. Germ, a member of the Rotary Club of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, and chair of the International PolioPlus Committee, is the selection of the Nominating Committee for President of RI in 2016-17.

For Rotary to thrive, Germ says, members must face current and future challenges and opportunities with “passion, enthusiasm, perseverance, and above all, integrity.”

“I envision Rotary boldly and creatively engaging the success of polio eradication, membership and identity issues, strengthening clubs, work with youth – our future lifeblood, and the creation of critical, strategic partnerships,” says Germ. “The 2016-17 Rotary year offers a tremendous opportunity for Rotary International and the Foundation partnership unified and thriving, on all levels, via the six areas of focus.”

Germ says no one should ever have to ask, “What is Rotary?”

“We will enhance Rotary’s public image by successfully and enthusiastically marketing who we are, what amazing things we are doing, and incredibly, have done locally and globally,” says Germ.

With the global economy still unpredictable, Germ says Rotary must make participation affordable and “also be unfailingly diligent in efforts to ensure we spend every dollar effectively and efficiently,” he says.

In 1965, after four years in the U.S. Air Force, Germ, an engineer, joined Campbell and Associates Inc., an engineering consulting firm. He now serves as the company’s board chair and chief executive officer.

He also serves on the boards of several organizations including the Public Education Foundation, Orange Grove Center Inc., and the Blood Assurance Inc. He is the founder and treasurer of the Chattanooga State Technical Community College Foundation and is president of the Tennessee Jaycee Foundation.

In 1970 he was recognized as Tennessee Young Man of the Year, Engineer of the Year, and Volunteer Fundraiser of the Year in 1992.

A Rotary member since 1976, Germ has served Rotary as vice president, director, Foundation trustee and vice chair, chair of Rotary’s US$200 Million Challenge, and RI president’s aide. He is a recipient of Rotary’s Service Above Self Award and The Rotary Foundation’s Citation for Meritorious Service and Distinguished Service Award. He and his wife, Judy, are members of the Arch Klumph Society.

“Rotary will adapt to a rapidly changing world by embracing innovation within the guidelines of our tradition and values,” says Germ. “By aggressively embracing new technologies, social media, and new opportunities, individuals and businesses will see that Rotary helps promote a good civic and public image while adding credibility to their people.”

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In addition, although a repeat of information we provided a couple of years ago, but for a little additional knowledge and fun, here’s a history of RI Presidents:

The first President of Rotary International was Paul Harris, but that is not as obvious as you might think. Paul Harris was not even the first President of a Rotary Club. While he founded Rotary by gathering his friends in Chicago in 1905, in fact Silvester Schiele (one of the original four) was chosen to serve as the first President of the new Club (and Paul Harris also served, later). But in 1910, when representatives of the first 16 Clubs in the world gathered and established the “National Association of Rotary Clubs,” Paul Harris was selected as the group’s first President, serving 1910-1911 and 1911-1912. (In 1912, with Clubs then in Canada, England, Ireland, and Scotland, the name was changed to “International Association of Rotary Clubs,” and then shortened in 1922 to Rotary International.)

Some firsts:

The first RI President from outside of the United States was E. Leslie Pidgeon, from the Rotary Club of Winnipeg (also the first Club outside of the United States).

One other Canadian followed in 1921-22 but the first President from outside of either the US or Canada was from the Rotary Club of Tampico, Mexico: I. B. Tom Sutton. (He was born and raised in Saginaw, Michigan.)

In 1931-32 RI was served by its first President from outside of North America entirely: Sydney W. Pascall, from the Rotary Club of London, England.

Other firsts for countries in the ensuing years:

Maurice Duperrey, RC Paris, France, 1937-38
Armando de Arruda Pereira, RC São Paolo, Brazil, 1940-41
Fernando Carbajal, RC Lima, Peru, 1942-43
Angus S. Mitchell, RC Melbourne, Australia, 1948-49
Joaquin Serratosa Cibils, RC Montevideo, Uruguay, 1953-54
Gian Paolo Lang, RC Livorno, Italy, 1956-57
Harold T. Thomas, RC Auckland, New Zealand, 1959-60
Nitish C. Laharry, RC Calcutta, India, 1962-63
Carl P. Miller, RC Los Angeles, California, 1963-64 (Los Angeles isn’t a country, we know)

(two previous RI Presidents were from San Francisco, but Carl Miller was the first from Southern California…LA5, the same Club it is today in District 5280)

C. P. H. Teenstra, RC Hilversum, The Netherlands, 1965-66
Kiyoshi Togasaki, RC Tokyo, Japan, 1968-69
Ernst G. Breitholtz, RC Kalmar, Sweden, 1971-72
W. Jack Davis, RC Hamilton, Bermuda, 1977-78
Rolf J. Klärich, RC Helsinki-Helsingfors, Finland, 1980-81
M.A.T. Caparas, RC Manila, Philippines, 1986-87
Robert Barth, RC Aarau, Switzerland, 1993-94
Luis Vicente Giay, RC Arrecifes, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1996-97
Bhichai Rattakul, RC Dhonburi, Bangkok, Thailand, 2002-2003
Jonathan B. Majiyagbe, RC Kano, Nigeria, 2003-2004
Dong Kurn “D.K.” Lee, RC Seoul Hangang, Seoul, Korea, 2008-2009
John Kenny, RC Grangemouth, Scotland, 2010-2011
Gary C.K. Huang, RC Taipei, Taiwan, 2014-2015
K.R. “Ravi” Ravindran, Rotary Club of Colombo, Western Province, Sri Lanka, 2015-2016

How is the Rotary International President chosen from year to year? We’ll let Past RI President Cliff Dochterman tell you, from his book “The ABCs of Rotary.”

Each year, a distinguished Rotarian is selected as the worldwide president of Rotary International. The process begins one year in advance when a 17-person nominating committee is elected from separate zones of the world. To qualify for the nominating committee, a Rotarian must have served on the RI Board of Directors. If no past director from the zone is able to serve, a past trustee of The Rotary Foundation or a past district governor who has served on an RI committee may be appointed to the nominating committee.

The nominating committee may consider all past RI directors for candidacy. Members of the nominating committee and current directors are not eligible. Any Rotary club may suggest the name of a former RI director to the committee for consideration.

The committee convenes in September to select the Rotarian to be the presidential nominee, whose name is announced to all clubs. Any Rotary club may make an additional nomination before 1 December, which must then be endorsed by 1 percent of all the Rotary clubs of the world (about 320 clubs). If such an event occurs, an election is held by mail ballot. If no additional nomination is presented by the clubs, the person selected by the nominating committee is declared the president-nominee. At the international convention, the president-nominee is elected by voice vote and becomes the president-elect for the following year, which is spent preparing to serve the Rotarians of the world as the international president.

 

The opinions expressed by guest speakers, or in advertisements that appear on external websites linked to this program, are those of the speaker(s) / websites / advertisers and not necessarily of the Rotary E-Club of The Greater San Fernando Valley or its members. No endorsement is implied. Programs are presented for informational purposes only.

 

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9 responses to 15 February 2016 — Presidents Day in the US, RI’s Next President

  1. Interesting to see the first presidents from around the world. Thanks for your time researching and writing this program.

    Sadly, some clubs missed or chose to completely ignore this message:
    “Rotary will adapt to a rapidly changing world by embracing innovation within the guidelines of our tradition and values,” says Germ. “By aggressively embracing new technologies, social media, and new opportunities, individuals and businesses will see that Rotary helps promote a good civic and public image while adding credibility to their people.”

    I’d like to see a younger professional female president of RI in the near future.

  2. I agree Linda. So glad to see a President who recognizes the need for Rotary to adapt and for that to happen we must focus on the youth.

  3. Thank you for this informative presentation.

  4. Quite informative. Great to see the “International” leadership in Rotary.

  5. Thank you for the information.

  6. Germ’s statement, “We will enhance Rotary’s public image by successfully and enthusiastically marketing who we are, what amazing things we are doing, and incredibly, have done locally and globally,” resonated with me. Today there is much to be said for a positive marketing campaign. It is up to each of us to share the wonderful projects we work on to make lives better both in our own backyard and across the world. The more we educate the community about who we are and what we do as Rotarians, the more we can inspire others to join in.

  7. Considering how rampant racism and discrimination was during the early part of the 20th century, I was pleased to read how RI was open to nominating and electing distinguished Rotarians from Latin American and other post colonial countries. However, it is time to consider a female president as Linda poignantly stated. Thank you for educating us on the process.

  8. I see that eradication of polio is first on his list of what he envisions for Rotary. Should we invite him to Dance for the Children?

  9. Rotary history is fascinating. Thank you!!

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